Delineating a New Target for Ovarian Cancer

Huang_001Published in Oncotarget, researchers led by Dr. Shuang Huang have identified a currently available drug that may benefit a subset of ovarian cancer patients. Results of GRU Cancer Center’s Drs. Huang and Han-Fei Ding and their collaborators show that cyclin E (CCNE1) overexpression did not correlate with tumorigenic potential in ovarian cancer cell lines, with histological types of tumor tissue, or with pathological grades of ovarian cancer.  However, CCNE1 overexpression was detected in more than 40% of the ovary tumor specimens evaluated.  In cell lines that overexpress CCNE1 versus those that do not, treatment with CCNE1 siRNA resulted in reduced cell growth. Since CCNE1 functions in complex with Cdk2, and recent studies reported increased Cdk2 activity in CCNE1-overexpressing cells, Dr. Huang’s team tested to find increased apoptosis in cells with elevated CCNE1 expression when exposed to a Cdk2 (but not Cdk1) inhibitor. Likewise, they report increased survival of tumor-bearing mice exposed to a Cdk2 inhibitor, but only when the tumors are derived from CCNE1-overexpressing cells.  Further studies indicate that the increased survival is a reflection of thwarted metastatic colonization. 

[Yang L, Fang D, Chen H, Lu Y, Dong Z, Ding HF, Jing Q, Su SB, Huang S. Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 is an ideal target for ovary tumors with elevated cyclin E1 expression. Oncotarget. 2015 Aug 28;6(25):20801-12.]

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Allison Brown
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Written by Allison Brown

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